Illinois Driver’s License Reinstatement Lawyers
Get Behind the
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DUI License
Revocation

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DUI Defense FAQ

If I get a DUI in Illinois, do I need an attorney?

If you are charged with a DUI in Illinois, there can be very severe consequences, and it is essential that you obtain the legal expertise of an experienced Illinois DUI defense attorney. Illinois law surrounding DUIs is constantly changing and is very complex and in order to navigate through it and get the best possible outcome, you should seek out the proficient attorneys at The Kurash Law Firm.

If I have been charged with a DUI, what is the worst possible situation that I could be in?

It depends on whether you were charged with a misdemeanor or a felony DUI. If this is your first offense and you plead guilty or if you are found guilty, you may only receive a sentence of court supervision. You will also usually receive a fine and will need to take alcohol classes, have an alcohol evaluation and in some instances, you may need to serve community service. There are some cases in which a first time offender may face time in prison, but those cases are very rare and are usually only in serious aggravating situations.

If this is not your first offense and you have been charged with a misdemeanor, you will be subjected to the consequences listed above and you have a greater chance of receiving jail time and having your driver’s license taken away.

If you are charged with a felony DUI, there can be even more severe punishments and the expert DUI attorneys at The Kurash Law Group can take a look at your specific case and let you know the possible consequences of your DUI charge.

If a police officer asks, do I need to submit to a field sobriety test?

You are not legally required to submit to a field sobriety test (FST). A police officer may request that you take a FST if they suspect that you have been drinking, and may include a one leg stand test, walk and turn test, and horizontal gaze nystagmus (HGN) test. There is not a penalty for refusing to take these tests and these tests are typically unreliable and subjective.

There is also not a penalty if you refuse to take a breath test before you are arrested. This test is called a preliminary breath test (PBT). You may have your driver’s license suspended if you fail the test or if you refuse the breath test at the police station, which is after you have been arrested.

How much will it cost if I get a DUI?

The two main costs that are associated with a DUI are the legal fees and any fines/court costs. How much you may need to pay in legal costs will depend on your specific situation and how complex your case is. During your free consultation at The Kurash Law Firm, we can discuss the specifics of your case and give you a more thorough quote on the cost.

Fines and court costs are the other costs and they will also depend on the specifics of your DUI, including which county you were arrested in. If your case is dismissed, there will not be any fines or court costs. If you are a first time offender who is facing a Class A misdemeanor, you may receive a maximum fine of $2,500 in addition to the required court costs.

What information should I give to the police before/after I am arrested for a DUI?

The only information that you are required to provide the police with is your driver’s license, proof of insurance and/or your vehicle registration. Any other questions they may ask, such as whether or not you have been drinking and where you are headed, do not need to be answered. In a polite manner, you can tell the officer that you will not be answering their questions. If you are placed under arrest, the police officer should not continue to ask you any questions until you have been read your Miranda rights.

It is in your best interest not to volunteer any information, since that information can be used against you even if your Miranda rights have not been read to you.